Armstrong To Admit Doping : Report

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staff
Lance Armstrong plans to admit, in an interview with Oprah Winfrey scheduled to tape on Monday, that he doped throughout his legendary cycling career, according to a published report.

Armstrong

Lance Armstrong plans to admit, in an interview with Oprah Winfrey scheduled to tape on Monday, that he doped throughout his legendary cycling career, according to a published report.

USA Today, quoting "a person with knowledge of the situation," said Armstrong, who was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles, will acknowledge doping but won't get into details about specific cases.

The paper said its source "spoke to USA Today Sports on the condition of anonymity because the person was not authorized to speak publicly about it."

The interview is set to take place Monday at Armstrong's Austin, Texas, home, and air Thursday on the Oprah Winfrey Network.

Armstrong, 41, has long denied he used performance enhancers, but recently was stripped of all his Tour titles and banned from professional cycling for life.

In October, the US Anti-Doping Agency released a wealth of material that showed Armstrong did, in fact, use performance enhancers and blood transfusions to gain an edge.

The report included statements from 11 former US Postal Team teammates, who testified against Armstrong.

According to the USA Today report, Armstrong's expected admission carries the risk of him being sued or held liable by parties that may feel he defrauded them during his years of saying he was clean.

Armstrong testified under oath in 2005 that he never doped, but criminal perjury charges would likely not be filed because of statute-of-limitations reasons, the paper said.

It's possible Armstrong is coming clean now in hopes of rehabilitating his image and getting his competition ban shortened.

Another possible reason: His fear the doping scandal will hurt the cancer-fighting charity he founded, Livestrong.

Armstrong, a cancer survivor, quit the board of directors of the organization in November in the wake of the USADA report. In October, he had resigned as chairman.

Armstrong representatives, including his attorney Tim Herman,  declined comment to the Associated Press.