Ryan Braun Suspended For Rest Of Season In Connection With Biogenesis Scandal

by
Owen Poindexter
Star outfielder Ryan Braun has been suspended for the remaining 65 games of the baseball season by Major League Baseball. Braun, who became the first player to successfully appeal a positive steroid test, will not appeal this one.


Ryan Braun has been suspended for PED use for the remaining 65 games of the season.

Star outfielder Ryan Braun has been suspended for the remaining 65 games of the baseball season by Major League Baseball. Braun, who became the first player to successfully appeal a positive steroid test, will not appeal this one, despite the presence of a confirmed test of performance enhancing drugs. The Milwaukee Brewers superstar was apparently doing his magic, which earned him the National League MVP and a similarly excellent season the next year.

Braun has been embroiled in the Biogenesis scandal since the past offseason, ever since reports came out that Braun and a number of other players were clients at a Miami-based “anti-aging clinic” which was actually doling out steroids to ballplayers.

"As I have acknowledged in the past, I am not perfect. I realize now that I have made some mistakes. I am willing to accept the consequences of those actions,” Braun said in a statement.

Braun is the highest-profile player in the Biogenesis scandal, but he’s not the only one on the list, and it seems likely that Major League Baseball will continue to suspend players. Among those connected to the Biogenesis clinic: Gio Gonzalez, Alex Rodriguez, Nelson Cruz, Jesus Montero, the suddenly really good again Bartolo Colon, Melky Cabrera, who was suspended last year for PED use, Jhonny Peralta, Yasmani Grandal, Francisco Cervelli, Fernando Martinez (of the Yankees, not the Astros), Everth Cabrera and Cesar Puello.

Braun’s suspension actually is well-timed for the Milwaukee Brewers, who are 41-56 and have no illusions about making the playoffs. Suspensions to Cruz, Colon or Gonzalez could have real playoff implications for the Rangers, A’s and Nationals, respectively.

Though a positive test is preferable to circumstantial evidence, if Major League Baseball could prove that Braun and others used beyond a reasonable doubt, the suspension will help them maintain credibility at a time when everyone who followed this case suspected that Braun et. al. were guilty.

Carbonated.TV