Apple Won't Give iPad Joy to a Son Who Lost His Mother to Cancer

by
Most tech companies these days give the impression that their prime reason for existence is to serve humanity with new and creative products.

Laptop

Most tech companies these days give the impression that their prime reason for existence is to serve humanity with new and creative products.

They've had us believing that making the human life easier is their top priority, but the way they deal with some of their own customers make us think otherwise.

The story here comes from London, UK, where a man named Josh Grant, whose deceased mother left him an iPad, can't get to convince Apple that he is now the legal and rightful owner of the tablet.

In an interview with BBC Radio 4's You & Yours, the 26-year-old revealed how his mother had bought an iPad two years ago to keep herself busy during her cancer treatment. But, unfortunately, the deadly disease took her life. Her belongings, including the said tablet, were bequeathed to her five sons.

The brothers mutually decided that Grant should be the one keeping the tablet, but the problem is that only their late mother knew the Apple ID and password that is set on the iPad so he can't get to use it.

The next logical move should've been to contact Apple and get the password reset, and it is exactly what Josh did. In fact, he provided the American company everything from copies of her mother's will to their lawyer's letter to even her death certificate.

But so stringent are Apple's security policies that nothing has worked so far. The culture of red tape at the Cupertino-based company is so rife that they are asking Grant to come up with written consent of the original owner, despite the fact that they've been explicitly told she is now dead.

"We obviously couldn't get written permission because mum had died," said Grant. "So my brother has been back and forth with Apple, they're asking for some kind of proof that he can have the iPad.

"We've provided the death certificate, will and solicitor's letter but it wasn't enough. They've now asked for a court order to prove that mum was the owner of the iPad and the iTunes account.

"It's going to have to go through our solicitor and he charges £200 an hour so it's a bit of a false economy."

Instances of such insensitivity towards customers aren't uncommon in the highly advanced tech world. Just last month, a software developer – whose valuable Twitter account was hacked – had to publish his story of great misfortune online because Twitter and GoDaddy would remain their callous, coldhearted self despite the uniqueness of the situation.

The era of the robots may be upon us, but we should all possess a certain level of humanity in our systems.

Read More: GoDaddy and PayPal’s Lax Security Policies Exposed

Carbonated.TV
View Comments

Recommended For You