Brilliant Technological Breakthroughs for Developing Countries

Neat. A football that creates energy when you kick it around. 'Soccket', which weighs 30 grams heavier than a standard football, captures the kinetic momentum generated during play and stores this inside the ball for later use as an off-grid power source. A simple 30 minutes play can power a simple LED lamp for three hours.

Energy Creating Football

Neat. A football that creates energy when you kick it around.

'Soccket', which weighs 30 grams heavier than a standard football, captures the kinetic momentum generated during play and stores this inside the ball for later use as an off-grid power source. A simple 30 minutes play can power a simple LED lamp for three hours.

Solar-Powered Whiteboard

A company in Africa CyberSmart is collaborating with the USAID to provide classrooms with an interactive solar-powered whiteboard using a projection screen.

Water-Collecting Billboard

A bunch of incredible Peruvian engineering students designed a scintillating billboard that retains and collects moisture from the air. In 3 months, their design was able to distribute almost 10,000 liters of water. This served as an answered prayer for the residents of the desert city, Lima.

Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi is a card-sized single-board computer pin invented by the foundation of the same name. The goal was to promote teaching of basic computer science in schools. This can go a long way in educating developing countries about computers.

Their website claims “It is a capable little computer which can be used in electronics projects, and for many of the things that your desktop PC does, like spreadsheets, word-processing and games. It also plays high-definition video. We want to see it being used by kids all over the world to learn programming”

Gravity Light

The Gravity Light was made by London-based designers Martin Riddiford and Jim Reeves of Therefore.com, who spent four years developing the light for developing countries. This innovative device generates light from gravity.

It takes a quick 3 seconds to lift the weight that powers GravityLight creating 25 minutes of light on its descent

Making new technologies more accessible

Developing countries could make noteworthy poverty-fighting progress by placing smart phones, tablets and computers into more of its citizens’ hands, helping technology spread more widely.

Carbonated.TV
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