Einstein Was Right, Gravitational Waves Are Real

Jessica Renae Buxbaum
Scientists just proved that Albert Einstein was indeed correct. A team of physicists observed ripples in space-time after two black holes collided – otherwise understood as gravitational waves.

This landmark discovery is the last missing puzzle piece to Einstein’s doubted theory of general relativity, thereby cementing his legacy.

Speaking at a press conference in Washington D.C., David Reitze, executive director of the LIGO project, announced the historic breakthrough.

 "We have detected gravitational waves,” he said.

"It's the first time the Universe has spoken to us through gravitational waves. Up until now, we've been deaf,” Reitze added.

The discovery was made by LIGO, a pair of L-shaped laser antennas designed to detect gravitational waves, on Sept. 14, 2015 in a collaborative project between California Institute of Technology and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

"Our observation of gravitational waves accomplishes an ambitious goal set out over five decades ago to directly detect this elusive phenomenon and better understand the universe, and, fittingly, fulfills Einstein's legacy on the 100th anniversary of his general theory of relativity," Reitze said in a statement.

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