Texting App Turns Off Spellcheck For 3 Days—The Results Are Hilarious

by
Kate Brown
Millennials aren’t given much credit to their spelling abilities, so this might not come as a huge shock, but teenagers and young adults are horrible spellers.

Millennial aren’t given much credit to their spelling abilities, so this might not come as a huge shock to some: teenagers and young adults are horrible spellers.

The Business Insider reports that Blend, a San Francisco-based group texting app (similar to Facebook Messenger or WhatsApp), decided to try a little experiment.

Last week, for a full 72 hours, Blend turned off their spell check on the app in an effort to “find out which words its users bungle the most.”

Using over 200,000 random users—generally between the ages of 16 and 24—Blend was able to identify the three most commonly misspelled words: weird, definitely, and Budweiser.

Apparently, weird was commonly misspelled as “wierd,” and Budweiser was misspelled “Budwieser.”

Turns out, millennial aren’t keen on the spelling rule “’i’ before ‘e’ except after ‘c.’”

Not only that, but many misspelled definitely as the adverb “defiantly.”

In an even more interesting experiment, Blend compared misspellings by region, finding that those on the West Coast misspelled words with double letters—for example, spelling “vacuum” as “vacum” and “possession” as “possesion.”

East Coasters, on the other hand, misspelled words like “restaurants,” forgetting to add that pesky “u.”

Not surprisingly, but to the dismay of many grammar nerds everywhere, “your,” “you’re,” as well as “there,” “they’re,” and “their,” were misspelled incredibly frequently.

In an even more interesting breakdown of the results, men misspelled words more frequently than women, and those between the ages of 19 and 21 were the worst spellers of them all.

It also appears that time is a heavy factor in spelling errors, as Blend reports that the most common times for misspellings were between 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m., as well as 10 p.m. and 11 p.m.—a finding that suggests users simply weren’t their sharpest at the start and finish of their day.

Banner Image Credit: Garry Knight/Flickr

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