This Small Canadian Town’s Sky Suddenly Turned Pink

by
Kate Brown
Iqaluit, Nunavut and its residents were in for quite a magical surprise on Tuesday morning: a pink-hued sky that many find hard to believe required #nofilter.

How do we get pink skies and what does it mean? It sure was eery in Iqaluit this afternoon.PHOTO: Nick Murray

Posted by CBC Nunavut on  Tuesday, January 12, 2016

Iqaluit, Nunavut and its 7,000 residents were in for quite a magical surprise on Tuesday morning: a pink-hued sky that many find hard to believe required #nofilter.

Nick Murray of CBC North snapped a photo of the rose-colored sky outside CBC's Iqaluit bureau, and posted it to their Facebook page.

"How do we get pink skies and what does it mean? It sure was eery in Iqaluit this afternoon," the caption read.

After just a day, the photo reached more than 200,000 people, many coming up with their own theories as to what could have caused it.

"Ziggy Stardust just flew by," Kevin Robinson commented, clearly referencing the recent death of David Bowie.

"Is it be cuz [sic] of your sunglasses?" another asked.

Others simply shared their own pictures of the incredible event.

While many debated what caused the color, CBC North meteorologist Ashley Brauweiler believed that light scattering, in which sunlight is reflected through particles in the atmosphere, is likely the culprit for this beautiful phenomenon.

"When the sun is at a low angle in the sky, the light has a longer distance to travel," said Brauweiler. "The blue [colouration, which leads to a more common 'blue sky'] gets removed by the ice crystals and salt in the air, which leaves red visible."

"The clouds are much larger than light waves, which allows them to take on the colour, in this case pink."

This color may have also been exaggerated given the time of day—roughly around sunset—that the majority of these pictures were taken.

Whatever the reason may be, it certainly made for some incredible pictures!

Banner Image Credit: CBC Nunavut

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