Worm With Hook-Like Fangs Eating A Fish Will Give You Nightmares

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The Bobbitt worm is named after Lorena Bobbitt, an American woman who severed her husband's genitalia with a kitchen knife in 1993.

 

 

In a scene many BBC "Blue Planet II" viewers found "scarier than any horror film," a meter-long aquatic carnivorous worm was caught on camera devouring an unsuspecting fish.

As the monstrous creature, commonly known as the Bobbit worm, hid itself deep in the sand, ready to attack, Sir David Attenborough's unmistakable voice explains: “It’s a giant carnivorous worm with a jaw as sharp as daggers. It pays to remember there is a Bobbit about.”

 

For those unaware, the Bobbit worm is named after Lorena Bobbitt, an American woman who severed her husband's genitalia with a kitchen knife in 1993.

In 2013, Wired.com, for its "Absurd Creature of the Week" category, listed the Bobbit worm as "the ocean’s most disturbing predator."

“We think that the eunicid injects some narcotizing or killing toxin in their prey animal," Luis F. Carrera-Parra and Sergio I. Salazar-Vallejo, ecologists specializing in annelid polychaetes at El Colegio de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR) in Campeche, Mexico, told the tech magazine.  “Such that it can be safely ingested — especially if they are larger than the worm — and then digested through the gut.”

"I had been wanting to film Eunice aphroditois, a Bobbit worm, for years," writes Jonathan Smith, producer of the wildly popular nature documentary series, on the program's website. "It’s a giant carnivorous worm that can grow over a meter long. With dagger sharp jaws and lightning fast reactions, it sits in a burrow waiting to ambush passing prey. Bobbits will take even large fish and drag them into their underground larder."

Thumbnail Credits : Jenny Huang, Flickr/Wikimedia Commons

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