Watch Police Officer Cry Hysterically After Fatally Shooting Unarmed Suspect

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Not all cops are unrepentant, heartless savages. The video of a police officer crying uncontrollably moments after shooting an unarmed man dead has gone viral.

In April 2014, Officer Grant Morrison of a Montana police department shot Richard Ramirez, 38, three times after Ramirez refused to comply with orders to raise his hands.

Ramirez, against whom two arrest warrants were out and who was also a suspect in a recent armed robbery, was high on methamphetamine at the time of his encounter with Morrison. He was seated in the back of a car when Morrison approached him and asked Ramirez six times to put his hands up.

His criminal record and refusal to oblige led Morrison to think that Ramirez was armed, after which he fatally shot him. But a quick search of his dead body revealed that he didn't have any weapons on him.

Having realized that his error of judgment has cost a man his life, Morrison broke down and cried while his colleagues tried to console him. He hid his face with his hands and punched the bonnet of his car while regretting his mistake. The entire incident following the shooting was recorded on their police car's dashcam.

In the video above, Morrison can also be heard telling his partner: "I thought he was going to pull a gun."

Later on in his court testimony, he added: "I knew in that moment, which later was determined to be untrue, but I knew in that moment he was reaching for a gun. I couldn’t take that risk ... I wanted to see my son grow up.”

The video was shown to the coroner’s jury in the case against Morrison; the jury later ruled Ramirez's death as noncriminal and cleared the cop from any wrongdoing.

Fatalities at the hands of police, including the Michael Brown and Eric Garner cases, have turned people's perception of police as ruthless killers. But the video above shows that not every cop is as unrepentant as we think. Also, not all police shootings are unjustified, just as it wasn't in Morrison's case.

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