How One California Mom Has Been Helping Thousands Of Refugees

Fleeing a war zone with no guarantees of a safe future can be a very distressing experience, especially for small children.

The beginning of 2015 brought with it an influx of refugees into Greece. After excessive travelling, and undertaking severe pains to settle down away from their homes, Syrian refugees still remain displaced and in a constant unease.

However, while people around the world are showing empathy towards their suffering and extending a helping hand, volunteers from nearby areas are going the extra mile to make the refugees feel more comfortable. 

One such lady is Cristal Logothetis who moved by the sadly viral images of Aylan Kurdi decided to do what she could to help.

While volunteering in one of the refugee camps in Athens she saw many mothers, even elder siblings carrying  small children through long distances and harsh surroundings.

"Being a mom myself, it was easy to imagine myself in their place, and how hard it would be for me to hold my son while I walked for hundreds of miles," she said.

This led her to start up a non-profit called Carry the Future, through which she collects donations of baby carriers. The organization only accepts Ergobaby, Babybjorn or Becco carriers since volunteers have limited time to ensure they are properly fitted.

"We have to fit refugees in about two minutes flat, usually in very chaotic and crowded harbors, and without any spoken instructions (given that most don’t speak English)," she said. "Because of that, wraps and slings are not a safe or efficient option. Structured carriers on the other hand are considerably more user friendly and have a much easier learning curve."

The organization has also taken things to the next level as it started a crowd funding campaign that has currently raised $136,197, in order to supply food and other necessities to the refuges reaching Kos.

Carry the Future has done considerable work since it has distributed more than 3,000 baby carriers so far, and have around the same number in Athens still waiting to be handed out by Thanksgiving.