Phuc Dat Bich Reveals Awkward Name Is A Hoax

by
Jessica Renae Buxbaum
An Australian man posted a picture of his passport after Facebook repeatedly banned him from the social network believing his name, Phuc Dat Bich, is fake.

Facebook on phone

Update:

An Australian man who claimed his name "Phuc Dat Bich" in viral rant over Facebook's real name policy has revealed that the post was a hoax.

 

Do you remember the story; The boy who cried wolf? Imagine that boy grew up into a mischievous man with 21st century...

Posted by Phuc Dat Bich on  Tuesday, November 24, 2015

Mashable discovered the man's real name is Thien Nguyen through tracking down a former classmate.

Nguyen admitted on Facebook that the name was a joke and proudly boasted how an "an average joe like myself can con the the biggest news sources with ease."


An Australian man posted a picture of his passport after Facebook repeatedly banned him from the social network believing his name, Phuc Dat Bich, is fake.

Bich vetted his frustrations on social media after having his account shut down several times. The post resonated with users, having been shared over 130,000 times.

Bich’s name, which is Vietnamese, is actually pronounced “Phoo Da Bic." 

“I find it highly irritating the fact that nobody seems to believe me when I say that my full legal name is how you see it,” he wrote in the viral rant. “I've been accused of using a false and misleading name of which I find very offensive. Is it because I'm Asian? Is it?”

 

I find it highly irritating the fact that nobody seems to believe me when I say that my full legal name is how you see...

Posted by Phuc Dat Bich on  Tuesday, January 27, 2015

This is not the first time Facebook has been under fire for their “real name” policy. Native Americans and drag queens have slammed the social media behemoth for suspending their accounts and transgender individuals have criticized Facebook for not allowing them to change their names when they transition.

In response to the uproar, Facebook's chief product officer, Chris Cox, issued an apology in October.

 

I want to apologize to the affected community of drag queens, drag kings, transgender, and extensive community of our...

Posted by Chris Cox on  Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Fortunately, two weeks ago, Facebook decided to lighten their authenticity policy.  Starting in December users will still have to use their real name but will be given the chance to submit evidence if their accounts are flagged.

Read more: Australian Woman Deported From UAE For "Writing Bad Words" On Facebook

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