Here’s The Truth Behind The Mysterious Border Checkpoint Erected Between Scotland & Britain

A group of pranksters erect a fake passport control post on the road that crosses from England to Scotland ahead of the independence referendum.

With less than three days left until the referendum on Scottish independence, motorists driving past the border at Carter Bar, near Jedburgh were shocked to see a “passport control centre.”

The barrier accompanied signs claiming to be from the “Scottish Border Agency.”

Much to the relief of “NO” voters, it was a hoax by group of English and Scottish people who wanted to lighten the independence debate.

The checkpoint prank was masterminded by photographer Jon Parker Lee who hails from Manchester, U.K.

"We've staged this together as a group of Scotland and English. We're simply united in having a laugh...Come what may, we all love a wind-up, and maybe this will give everyone a laugh and a break from the ever-increasing heat of the debate," Lee said in an interview.

"The debate needed a bit of a joke.”

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On Sept. 18, voters in Scotland will be asked in a referendum whether they want the nation to become independent from the rest of the United Kingdom – a vote that will put an end to the 305-year-old political union with England.

If a majority of voters say YES to self-rule that day, then Scotland will become an independent country in full control of its important policies, including defense, tax revenue, fiscal and foreign and immigration affairs.

After a process of negotiations over matters like border closures, national debt and new currency, the transfer of power over from Westminster to the Scottish Parliament will officially take place.

Although both the anti- and pro-independence sides claim they have majority support, a recent YouGov poll conducted for The Sunday Times showed the "yes" vote at 51 percent and "no" at 49 percent.

The poll of 1,084 voters excluded undecided voters and YouGov said the numbers represented "a statistical dead heat."