China’s New Glass Walkway Is 88 Stories High And Has No Handrails

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The transparent, fenceless glass walkway extends 197 feet in length but is only 3.9 feet wide. Visitors can only walk or sit on it for up to 30 minutes.

Shanghai Skyscraper

The latest tourist attraction in China is both terrifying and amazing. Actually, it is only meant for daredevils with nerves of steel, because normal folks usually don’t feel comfortable dangling off a 88-story skyscraper.

The Jin Mao Tower in Shanghai’s financial district Lujiazui has recently opened an outdoor glass walkway, which is over 1,100 feet high and extends 197 feet in length. Known as the “skywalk,” the transparent structure is only 3.9 feet wide and had no railings to hold on to.

The acrophobia-inducing walkway is the tallest of its kind in the world.

“I thought my legs would tremble because of fear, but they didn’t,” said 28-year-old Hu Siqin. “The first 30 seconds were pretty scary, but after that, I felt calm.”

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Fifteen visitors can walk or sit on the skywalk at a time, fastened to a beam with a length of rope and a safety belt. Two security personnel are also present on the walkway and everyone is required to wear helmets during the whole process.

While the handrails-free walkway sounds petrifying, it presents visitors with a breathtaking view of the sprawling metropolis.

The structure will be open to public next week. Visitors will have to pay 388 yuan ($58) for a stroll in the sky.

 

The 88-story skyscraper is home to the Grand Hyatt Shanghai hotel and many international banks and organizations. Moreover, American architect Arian Smith, who designed Trump International Hotel and Tower in Chicago and the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, also designed this building.

“We think everyone in the world will love this,” said Wang Chaonina, the spokesperson from Jin Mao Tower.

 

Visitors can test their courage on Shanghai skywalk #shanghai #jinmaotower http://ow.ly/VeHL302GijH

A photo posted by Discover China (@discoverchina365) on

 

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