This Is What One Year Of Weather Looks Like From Space

Kate Brown
This video, taken over an entire year in space, is a true testament to the chaotic beauty inherent in the kind of weather we saw throughout the year 2015.

An incredible video uploaded by The European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), an international organization dedicated to monitoring weather and climate from space, is sure to make your head spin.

EUMETSAT explains that “The visualisation has been produced by EUMETSAT's data visualisation team and is composed of a satellite infrared data layer superimposed over NASA's 'Blue Marble Next Generation' ground maps, which change with the seasons.”

Slate reports that the satellites that were used to create this incredible video “belong to the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, or EUMETSAT, the U.S.A’s National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA).”

Along with audio commentary from Mark Higgins, a training manager at EUMETSAT, this video shows you an incredible visualization of what the weather throughout the world looks like from space.

From January to December, viewers get to actually see the snow melt in spring before appearing again in the winter months. Clouds seem to swirl and dance—like the Tropical Cyclone Pam in March—around the globe while Higgins explains what weather phenomenon was happening at the time.

Although this might potentially seem a bit dull, it’s rather absorbing—especially if you’re in the mood to zone out and simply absorb some cool facts.

Check out the video below:

Banner Image Credit: EUMETSAT/YouTube