A 10-Year-Old Named Clark Kent Broke Michael Phelps’ Long-Held Record

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“Always have fun and never give up on your dreams, no matter what anybody says – and yes that was one of my dreams, to beat Michael Phelps' record,” said the 10-year-old.

 

A young swimmer from California lived up to his heroic name after breaking Olympic champion Michael Phelps’ 100-meter butterfly record by more than a second.

Competing at the Far West International Championship in California, 10-year-old Clark Kent Apuada (yes, that’s his real name) won the race in 1:09:38 – which is more than a second faster than the record Phelps set in the same category of boys 10 and under during the competition back in 1995.

Phelps then went on to win 28 Olympic medals while his record remained untouched, that is, until now.

Clark, who is obviously called “Superman” by his friends, swims for the Monterey County Aquatic Team. And as if smashing Phelps’ decades-long record wasn’t enough, the young Filipino-American prodigy also won first place medals in seven other events.

“This kid is unlike any other young man that I've ever coached,” a swim coach, Dia Riana, told CNN in an interview. “He's always stood out, he's just… he's kind of a savant of sorts.”

Apparently, Clark is a kid of many talents. According to his father, Chris Apuada, the 10-year-old “does piano lessons, he does martial arts, and at school if there's a computer class, coding, or STEM programs he's always joining.”

Speaking KION, one of Clark's coaches, Travis Rianda, described him as “incredible.”

“He's a musician, he's a scientist, he's an artist, he's a martial artist, and he's an incredible human being,” Rianda said. “He's what I strive to achieve.”

Meanwhile, Clark hopes to compete in Olympics one day.

“I deal with it really well, I just have to balance,” he said. “I love swimming because I have a lot of people supporting me and my coaches are always there for me and my parents are always there.”

He also had a few words of inspiration for those who might be a little scared of following their dreams.

“Always have fun and never give up on your dreams, no matter what anybody says – and yes that was one of my dreams, to beat Michael Phelps' record,” the boy added.

Given the fact Phelps was only 15 when he participated in his first Olympics and Clark just broke his 23-year record in a swimming competition, the future prospects for the young swimmer appear rather bright.

Thumbnail/Banner Credits: Pixabay

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