Man Jumps In Canal To Escape Police – Regrets Instantly

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The 22-year-old is now charged with resisting an arrest and possession of a control substance after police recovered seven vials of THC oil in his car.

 

A man in Florida attempted to flee from the police and while doing that he jumped into water. Soon he realized it was just not his day and instantly regretted the action.

The water was not from usual waterway but it was toxic algae.

Abraham Duarte was pulled over for allegedly speeding by police in Cape Coral. When he was unable to find a way, he decided to jump into a nearby waterway. Therefore, he parked his car there and jumped in the canal in hopes to get away with the police.

However, within seconds he was crying for help.

What is even more horrific is that while he tried to swim, he swallowed some of the toxic water.

“Help me. Help me. I’m dying. I’m dying,” he said as he pleaded for help.

The incident was captured on camera by the officers’ bodycam where they could be seen chasing the 22-year-old on foot. He can then be seen in the toxic water pleading for help because he soon realized there was no other option left for him.

The cops then help him out of the toxic algae and splash water on his body and in his mouth to get rid of the toxic material. He then told the officers that he swallowed some of the material which is why he wanted to go the hospital.

Police officers took him to a nearby hospital, got his checkup done and then transferred him to the county jail.

The 22-year-old is now charged with resisting an arrest and possession of a control substance after police recovered seven vials of THC oil in his car.

For humans, exposure to toxic algae can cause respiratory difficulties, burning eyes and skin irritation. The toxins are often fatal to marine life.

The algae are smelly and toxic. People near it tend to cover their faces with masks.

Scientists in the state are on the cusp of developing promising methods to control toxic algae blooms like the “red tide” that has been killing marine life along a 150-mile (240-km) stretch of the Gulf Coast.

The red tide also has been implicated in at least 266 sea turtle strandings and is suspected or determined to have caused 68 manatee deaths so far this year, according to Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission figures.

Spotlight, Banner: Pedro Portal/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images

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