Cop Shared Money Stolen During Illegal Traffic Stops With Drug Dealers

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A former police officer was accused of pulling people over, stealing their money, then cutting the profits with drug dealers with whom she was associated.

Police officers walking toward the camera.

Former Georgia police officer Lori Monique Johnson is being indicted for using her position as a peace officer to hold fake traffic stops in order to seize money from drivers then pass it on to drug dealers.

Johnson reportedly ran the scheme at least twice between April 29, 2014, and March, 13, 2015, The Root reports.

In October 2017, Johnson, who was being probed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the DeKalb County District Attorney’s Office, resigned.

Serving as a DeKalb County officer, Johnson appeared to use her position to target drug dealers in fake traffic stops, take their money, then give it to dealers she was associated with. They would then give her a percentage of the “profits.”

She also used another officer’s traffic stop to carry out the same scheme. Officials said Johnson took more than $150,000 thanks to this stunt.

On Friday, a grand jury handed down charges to Johnson, including one violation of the Racketeer Influence and Corrupt Organizations Act, and 13 counts of breaking her oath as an officer.

While this story may seem shocking, it’s far from the first time the DeKalb County Police made headlines for its officers’ misconduct.

Last year, DeKalb County Police officer P.J. Larscheid was caught on camera beating a homeless woman. Despite the incident, Larscheid remains employed with the department, The Root reports.

After Johnson’s story broke, the department’s head, Chief James Conroy, said that the former officer’s actions were both “unacceptable” and “reprehensible.”

“Her actions tarnish the reputations and service which is demonstrated by our honorable law enforcement officers each and every day,” he said.

With so many cases of abuse of power coming from the same department, it’s tough to imagine that this particular agency has any reputation left to tarnish.

Banner and thumbnail credit: Reuters, Benoit Tessier 

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