Relatives Turn In California Man Who Had Kill Lists Of Local Jews

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Police arrested Nicholas Rose after a family member notified officers that the suspect said he wanted to kill people and vocalized threats against Jews.

A teacher in Irvine, California, was charged with hate crimes on Thursday after he made threats against Jews, the Orange County District Attorney’s office announced.

Nicholas Rose, 26, could be sentenced to more than six years in state prison if convicted. He has plead not guilty to felony charges of attempted criminal threats and misdemeanor accounts of violating civil rights.

Police arrested Rose, who teaches English as a second language, after a family member notified officers that the suspect said he wanted to kill people and vocalized threats against Jews.

When officers visited his home to investigate, they found anti-Semitic texts, a list titled “Killing my first Jew,” and “kill lists” featuring prominent Jewish figures in the local community and entertainment industry, as well as .22-caliber ammunition. They also discovered documents about specific worship centers, including a nearby synagogue, Greek Orthodox Church, and Russian Orthodox Church.

Although Senior Deputy District Attorney Jeff Moore did not disclose who was on the uncovered lists, he said police have notified the individuals who were named.

Moore also said Rose’s computer and cellphone records are being reviewed, and prosecutors are attempting to figure out whether the suspect, who is being detained on $500,000 bond, is part of a hate group.

“From his writings it’s hard to tell exactly what direction he’s going in or who he was angry with,” Moore said. “He was apparently displeased with some churches that he thought were sympathetic to the Jewish cause.”

Although the sentiments expressed by Rose are disturbing, they are part of a concerning pattern across the country. Anti-Semitic incidents in the country rose significantly last year, reaching the highest level since 1994. Jewish graves or cemeteries were targeted in hate incidents seven times in 2017. The rise in anti-Semitic incidents was accompanied by a catastrophic increase in white supremacist events.

While troubling, President Donald Trump’s failure to confront white supremacy, and his appointment of figures with concerning records on race issues, seem to suggest that there won’t be a systematic federal attempt to prosecute hate crimes anytime soon.

Banner/thumbnail image credit: Wikimedia Commons, dave conner

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