Mike Pompeo's 'A New Iran Strategy' Speech Lacked The Strategy Bit

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A major chunk of Pompeo's address contained 12 tough, and almost impossible, demands for a possible new treaty, leaving little to no advantage for Iran.

Just weeks after President Donald Trump pulled out of the Iran nuclear deal, his Secretary of State Mike Pompeo outlined, what he referred to as, "A New Iran Strategy."

However, an in-depth analysis of the address shows the speech outlined anything but a strategy.

How so?

For starters, a major chunk of Pompeo's address contained 12 tough, and almost impossible, demands for a possible new treaty, leaving little to no advantage for Iran. [That's not how peace treaties work, by the way.]

Just take a look at the first five conditions:

  1. Iran must declare to the IAEA a full account of the prior military dimensions of its nuclear program, and permanently and verifiably abandon such work in perpetuity.
  2. Second, Iran must stop enrichment and never pursue plutonium reprocessing. This includes closing its heavy water reactor.
  3. Third, Iran must also provide the IAEA with unqualified access to all sites throughout the entire country.
  4. Iran must end its proliferation of ballistic missiles and halt further launching or development of nuclear-capable missile systems.
  5. Iran must release all U.S. citizens, as well as citizens of our partners and allies, each of them detained on spurious charges.

So, while asking Iran to do most of the work, Pompeo didn't seem too keen on giving anything in return.

Again, that is not how peace agreements work.

But, then again, peace might not be what Pompeo is after.

He is a rabid Islamophobe and has been a longtime, fierce, opponent of Iran, which he has referred to as “a thuggish police state” and a “despotic theocracy.”

Pompeo was confirmed as secretary of state just in April and he has already railed against Iran in three different countries. In fact, in the Heritage Foundation speech, he threatened to "crush" Iranian operatives and said "Iran will never again have carte blanche to dominate the Middle East."

Such hostile rhetoric is not likely to yield a new treaty.

As to how exactly the U.S. would convince Tehran to give up all its nuclear technology, Pompeo did not explain. He didn't even say how the Trump administration planned to deal with the anger and disappointment of European allies, which still back the deal.

The nuclear deal was carefully crafted after years of hard work and negotiations between experts and lawmakers. While Iran got to possess its program, the threat of a nuclear-armed Iran was decreased by a decade.

Pompeo, and the Trump administration, as a whole, wants to scrap all that research for wishful thinking, it appears.

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Thumbnail/Banner Credits: Reuters

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