National Enquirer Paid Trump Doorman $30,000 To Quiet Affair Rumors

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President Donald Trump's ex-doorman, Dino Sajudin, had heard rumors the businessman had fathered a child out of wedlock with a woman he had been having an affair with.

President Donald Trump speaks into a microphone.

The parent company of the National Enquirer, a noted ally to President Donald Trump, allegedly paid his former doorman tens of thousands of dollars for exclusive rights to a story they never intended to publish.

The Associated Press report about how American Media Incorporated paid Dino Sajudin $30,000 is reminiscent of another payoff that company made to an adult model who said she had slept with Trump. And similar to that tale, Sajudin’s story involved a salacious scandal between Trump and another mistress.

The ex-doorman, the AP discovered, was privy to rumor of a relationship between Trump and another woman who lived at Trump World Tower. That relationship, Sajudin had heard, resulted in a child fathered by Trump with the unnamed woman in question.

The woman at the center of the rumor has denied its authenticity.

“This is all fake,” she said. “I think they [AMI] lost their money.”

Nevertheless, the media company spending $30,000 to buy exclusive rights to Sajudin’s story — and subsequently sit on it — raises serious questions about their motivations.

“AMI doesn’t go around cutting checks for $30,000 and then not using the information,” former AMI editor and reporter Jerry George said.

This isn’t unfamiliar ground, however, for the company. Former Playboy model Karen McDougal alleged that her story about an affair she had with Trump was also bought by AMI only to never be published as well.

Besides the revelations of Trump’s alleged adultery being exposed, the AP report reveals why the president may be more supportive of some media companies over others. While he frequently calls reports from mainstream companies “fake news,” Trump has had a relatively positive relationship with AMI, which has generally published articles to his liking.

But AMI’s methods of concealing stories from would-be readers’ eyes should be seen as deeply troubling. Rather than providing a genuine service to those they write for, the company seems more dedicated to hiding the truth and helping the president.

The methods AMI uses to conceal headline-worthy stories should cause anyone thinking about reading their publications to reconsider their go-to choices to get real news.

 

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