Navy Veteran’s Mom Couldn’t Get Visa To Attend Her Son’s Funeral

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“He's already done for this country, but what has this country done for him? What did this country do for him?” lamented the U.S. Navy veteran’s father.

A U.S. Navy veteran was buried amid his mother making efforts to see her son one last time before he was laid to rest.

Ngoc Truong died last year in December, shortly after being diagnosed with leukemia. The 22-year-old left the Navy in October after being in service for four years. He was a machinist's mate aboard the U.S.S. John McCain.

Troung was born in Vietnam but he was a .U.S. citizen who lived in Arkansas.

His mother, who was divorced and still lived in Vietnam, applied for a visa after hearing about her son’s demise. But her request was reportedly turned down not once but twice and she was unable to attend her son’s funeral.

Apparently, the U.S. State Department didn’t even give a reason for denying her visa.

When asked to provide details, State Department said it couldn’t provide any more details about the case. "Visa records are confidential under U.S. law," a State Department official said. "We are unable to discuss specific visa cases."

Truong was finally laid to rest on Dec. 26 without his mother present at the funeral ceremony. On his grave were the words of John F. Kennedy, “Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.”

Troung’s father, Hung Truong, who is a jewelry store owner and lives in Blytheville, was “fuming mad” on the State Department’s conduct.

“He's already done for this country, but what has this country done for him? What did this country do for him?” he lamented.

Many people slammed the State Department for denying the navy veteran’s mother’s visa.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thumbnail/Banner Image: Reuters, Larry Downing

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