Saudi Man Wanted To Portray Women As Reckless Drivers — It Backfired

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“They just want to plant a negative idea about girls, that they'll drift and cause problems in the country after they started driving,” one Twitter user said.

 

A teenager in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia, has been arrested after he cross-dressed as a woman while driving a car.

Saudi traffic authorities were shocked to see someone they thought was a woman, drifting her car on the road. But when the police caught the culprit after a car chase, they were stunned to find a young man dressed in an elaborate abaya.

The Tabuk traffic authority stated the 19-year-old and his companion, who was also in the car, were immediately arrested.

Drifting or “tafheet” as it is called in Arabic is a dangerous car stunt and illegal in Saudi Arabia. Many Saudis believe the young man’s motive was to portray women — who just, last week, had a driving ban lifted from them after three decades of activism — were not responsible drivers.

 

“They just want to plant a negative idea about girls, that they'll drift and cause problems in the country after they started driving,” one Twitter user said.

 

“He deserves to be arrested, he had such vile intentions,” another said.

 

“He wanted to ruin the image of women and got caught,” Twitter user Xshamxii said.

Other people thought the man dressed as a woman because he probably thought he would get away with performing the dangerous stunt because police would not be inclined to chase a vehicle driven by a woman.

Saudi women took cars to the road for the first time on June 24 after the Gulf kingdom overturned the world’s only female driver ban. The much-touted move is part of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s plan to modernize the patriarchal petro-state; however, before and after the lifting of the ban, women experienced a lot of issues from men.

Just a day before the ban was lifted, false stats hit the internet claiming majority of the women failed their driving tests. On June 24, women claimed they were chased by cat-calling men when they took the wheels for the first time.

Worse, weeks before the kingdom allowed women to drive, Saudi government cracked down on women activists and jailed 17 of them, citing they were aiding enemies of the state and undermining national security. Nine of them have still not been released.

Thumbnail/Banner Credits: Reuters

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